Couch Film Festival :: Seven Heroes

Seven Samurai (1954)

A samurai answers a village’s request for protection after he falls on hard times. The town needs protection from bandits, so the samurai gathers six others to help him teach the people how to defend themselves, and the villagers provide the soldiers with food.

Of course, the movie climax is a great battle when 40 bandits attack the village.

The seven heroes, with the aid of the villager and creativity they defend the village.

Seven Samurai was among the first films to use the now-common plot element of the recruiting and gathering of heroes into a team to accomplish a specific goal.

Seven Samurai has been continuously ranked highly in critics’ greatest films lists and has remained highly influential, often seen as a masterpiece and one of the most “remade, reworked, referenced” films in cinema.


Related “Seven Heroes” Films:

The Magnificent Seven (1960)

The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 American Western film directed by John Sturges and starring Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Horst Buchholz, James Coburn, Brad Dexter, Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn, and Charles Bronson.

The film is an Old West-style remake of Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 Japanese film Seven Samurai. Brynner, McQueen, Buchholz, Bronson, Vaughn, Coburn, and Dexter portray the title characters, a group of seven gunfighters hired to protect a small village in Mexico from a group of marauding bandits and their leader (Wallach).

The film’s musical score was composed by Elmer Bernstein. In 2013, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Bonus :: Gay Symbols Everywhere

Battle Beyond the Stars (1980)

Battle Beyond the Stars is a 1980 American science fiction adventure film produced by Roger Corman and directed by Jimmy T. Murakami] that stars Richard Thomas, Robert Vaughn, George Peppard, John Saxon, Sybil Danning, and Darlanne Fluegel.[8]

Battle Beyond the Stars, intended as a “Magnificent Seven in outer space”, is based on The Magnificent Seven (in which Vaughn also appeared), the Western remake of Akira Kurosawa’s film Seven Samurai.

The screenplay was written by John Sayles, the score was composed by James Horner, and the special effects were designed by James Cameron.

A young farmer sets out to recruit mercenaries to defend his peaceful planet, which is under threat of invasion by the evil tyrant Sador and his armada of aggressors.

Bonus :: Cheesefest

A Bug’s Life (1998)

A Bug’s Life is a 1998 American computer-animated comedy adventure film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures. Directed by John Lasseter and Andrew Stanton, the film involves a misfit ant named Flik that is looking for “tough warriors” to save his colony from greedy grasshoppers, only to recruit a group of bugs that turn out to be an inept circus troupe.

Randy Newman composed the music for the film, which stars the voices of Dave Foley, Kevin Spacey, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Hayden Panettiere, Phyllis Diller, Richard Kind, David Hyde Pierce, Joe Ranft, Denis Leary, John Ratzenberger, Jonathan Harris, Madeline Kahn, Bonnie Hunt, Mike McShane, and Brad Garrett.

Flik  is an inventive ant who’s always messing things up for his colony. His latest mishap was destroying the food stores that were supposed to be used to pay off grasshopper Hopper. Now the strong-arming insect is demanding that the ants gather double the food — or face annihilation. To avert disaster, Flik goes on a journey to recruit fighters to defend the colony. When he meets a band of seven high-flying circus insects, he thinks he’s found his salvation.

Bonus :: Kid Friendly

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